VCRP™ for Multi-Tier/Site Life Science

Complete root supplier to end customer multi-tier value chain Planning, Visibility and Collaborative management solutions pre-configured with dozens of customer, distributor, supplier and sub-supplier partner sites in ready to populated with Customer, BOM, Partner, Supplier, Sub-Supplier and logistics data. Data can come from yours and your Partner’s FDA Validated MES, QC, Recall, Logistics, Clinical and ERP implementations, and VCRP can be the system of record for data you do not currently have in your applications. In either case, the information required to make your complete solution work is synchronized among the key partners you actively need to collaborate with. VCRP™ supports all EDI and B2B exchange “flavors”, so any existing or future connectivity requirements can be supported via configuration. VCRP™ can be integrated with all major medical ERPS as well.

Improve product integrity across Value Chain

  • Multi-tier lot traceability down to point of use
  • US, EU, China Drug Safety Act compliance
  • Focus and refine recall impacts
  • Chain of Custody: spoilage, theft, counterfeiting/gray market

Sustain Continuous Differentiation

  • Enable Adaptive processes to capture new market opportunities
  • Kitting, co-packing, late stage labeling, omni-channel fulfillment
  • Recall execution, inventory balancing

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Recent News


The World is Flattening – Let’s Get Moving!

Global flattening and the exponential advances in technology are revolutionizing the way we live and do business! This is an era where mind boggling advances in a new digital infrastructure, changes in public policy and the effects of globalization are enabling unknown companies to emerge overnight and dominate industries using information and time as competitive weapons. Thomas Friedman wrote about this in his best-selling book “The World is Flat”, as well as countless others in leading publications such as the Harvard Business Review and the Economist. It’s an undeniable fact that the new economy works across borders, languages, currencies and cultures. It’s also an inescapable fact that the dynamics of legacy supply chain processes and incumbent business relationships make it difficult to adapt to these international realities and new competitive landscape. How do you respond to globalization? For too long we have focused on traditional performance improvement areas “within the four walls” and with continually diminishing returns. We need order of magnitude, game-changing improvements, not percentage point improvements. A company’s success in the new economy is increasingly less dependent on individual performance and more dependent on the overall success of the supply chains they participate in. The supply chain that can satisfy the needs of the customer better – wins. Companies need to look outside their four walls, embrace change, embrace new technologies and eliminate the barriers throughout their extended value chain that impede the flow of information and decisions. Time is a company’s most valuable asset and those with the greatest return on time can respond quicker, out-think and out-maneuver the competition. Speed is a devastating competitive advantage... read more

The Refrain is the Same: Can You See Me Now?

Every year there are several surveys asking supply chain executives to rank the challenges they face. And, for as long as I can remember, supply chain visibility ranks at or near the top. This year’s reincarnation of the control tower metaphor is being applied to supply chain visibility. Can you see me now? If it’s so critical, why haven’t we implemented it? —Rich Sherman, Supply Chain Discipline Expert at Trissential The supply chain landscape is composed of many different applications and systems often within an enterprise, let alone the inclusion of the customers and suppliers required to achieve end-to-end supply chain visibility. It’s a complex functional and technical network. There are many vendors addressing the issue; after all, in many ways it represents the Holy Grail. However, the problem is that for supply chain visibility to work, many systems from many vendors are going to have to interoperate. And, which company in the supply network is going to be the “mother ship”? Your customer and supplier base are composed of competitors to one another and you’re not their only trading partner. Like them, you have competitors that are their customers and suppliers. Aha! Perhaps this is the reason that for as long as we can remember, supply visibility is the most desired yet underserved solution in supply chain. That is not to take away from the number of vendors that are providing visibility to a limited subset of the supply chain. There are some solutions in transportation, electronic transaction exchange, procurement, intra-industry collaboration, and other functional capabilities that provide control-tower-like applications. Just no one seems to be addressing a company’s entire supply chain. Well, no one except Hewlett-Packard. In contract with Vecco International, H-P defined and developed a technology agnostic collaboration platform, primarily to incorporate their supplier base... read more

Responsibility Lies with Leaders

First published in the April 2012 edition of the Lean Management Journal (LMJ) and republished here with permission. When it comes to sustainably and profitably growing an organisation in the face of changing market conditions, Roddy Martin identifies various ‘disconnects’ within these initiatives. To understand and manage these disconnects, a four-layer management system must be well understood by executive leadership teams: Systems of Control, Systems of Record, Systems of Process and Systems of Venture and Sufficiency. Another disconnect is IT’s role within these four layers in order to collaborate, not hinder the process. Roddy explains how executive leadership teams can overcome these hurdles. Roddy Martin proposes a four-layer management system model and explains why alignment between these four layers is so critical. As continuous improvement and supply chain performance improvement practitioners, we know that aligning business operating strategy and business performance improvements, and building end-to-end supply chain capabilities to achieve competitive advantage, are merging to achieve one goal: To grow sustainably and profitably while weathering the dynamics of market change. In reality, however, ‘disconnects’ and ‘project-based approaches’ in these initiatives highlight cross-functional gaps that stand in the way of collaboratively building an end-to-end business with demand-driven process capabilities. “Disconnects” are characterised in the following leadership questions: What is the challenge involved in translating and aligning the business operating strategy into end-to-end business processes and supply chain design, and in achieving sustainable performance improvement capabilities by aligning with continuous improvement? What factors are in the way of aligning and synchronising IT with business and supply chain transformation? How is leading and managing the transformational change embedded into every maturity stage... read more